Chinese at Bard

Chinese at Bard

The Chinese Program at Bard College is housed within the Asian Studies Program and the Foreign Languages Cultures and Literature Program. It aims to give students, both majors and non-majors, a solid training in spoken and written Chinese language, and an introduction to critical approaches to a broad range of Chinese culture, including classical and modern literature, Chinese history, philosophy, visual arts, film, and popular culture.

Chinese/ Asian Studies

The Chinese Program at Bard College is housed within the Asian Studies Program and the Foreign Languages Cultures and Literature Program. It aims to give students, both majors and non-majors, a solid training in spoken and written Chinese language, and an introduction to critical approaches to a broad range of Chinese culture, including classical and modern literature, Chinese history, philosophy, visual arts, film, and popular culture. By the time they enter their senior year, the students who have completed the set series of courses are expected to be able to communicate with native speakers, to read and write Chinese with relative ease, and to incorporate material in Chinese language into their senior projects.

The linguistic training begins with Chinese 101, an introductory course that focuses on the fundamentals of modern Chinese, followed by Chinese 106, an intensive course that accelerates the development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The eight-week Summer Intensive Program in Qingdao, China that takes place at the completion of Chinese 106 provides students with opportunities both inside and outside the classroom to experience China through intensive language study, well-developed courses on Chinese culture, tours and sightseeing trips, and participation in the daily lives of the local residents. Having completed the Summer Intensive Program, the students enroll in Chinese 301 and 302, a one-year advanced study, to further consolidate basic skills. The upper-level courses (303 and above) are designed to expose students to authentic and original texts, to enhance their ability to comprehend and discuss serious topics in Chinese critically and analytically.

In addition to courses offered by the Chinese Program, a wide variety of China-related courses are offered in History, Art History, Religion, Film Studies, Economics, Political Studies, International Studies, and other programs. Students should seek help from their department advisers in developing a well-integrated academic program built around their interests and drawing upon this rich variety of resources.

Faculty

Wah Guan Lim
Li-hua Ying (On sabbatical Spring 2016)
Faculty contact and profile information may be found here.

Sample Courses

Current Course List (click here)
Beginning Chinese
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Intermediate Chinese I-II
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Advanced Chinese I-II
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Intensive Chinese
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Asian Humanities Seminar
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Theater and Performance in the Chines-Speaking World
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Echoes of the Past: Chinese Cinema and Traditional Chinese Literature
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The Chinese Novel
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Modern Chinese Fiction
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Chinese Fantastic Tales
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Lu Xun and the Modern Chinese Short Story
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Contemporary Chinese Pop Culture
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Classical Chinese
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Chinese Calligraphy
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China in Film and Literature I, II
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Additional Studies

Asian Studies Program

Asian Studies Website

The Asian Studies Program offers courses in anthropology, art history, classical studies, economics, film, gender studies, historical studies, human rights, literature, music, philosophy, political studies, religion, and theater. In consultation with a member of the program faculty, students select a regional and disciplinary focus in order to create a coherent program of study. Although the program focuses on China, Japan, and South Asia, students can investigate bordering regions such as Central Asia, Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, Korean peninsula, and Pacific Islands. Intellectual emphasis is placed on comparative perspectives, both within Asia and with other regions.
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Requirements

Before Moderation, usually by the end of the second year at Bard, students whose concentration is Chinese Language and Literature will have taken at least 1 year of Chinese (12 credits) and at least 2 courses (8 credits) in Chinese literature and culture. To graduate, students need 44 credits consisting of the following:
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